ReFED: Committed to Reducing U.S. Food Waste

ReFED: Committed to Reducing U.S. Food Waste

Each year, the United States wastes 63 million tons of food – that’s $218 billion of waste. Forty percent of the food that is produced goes uneaten. An average family throws away 25 percent of groceries they purchase. These are alarming statistics and, worse yet, one in seven Americans suffer from food insecurity, meaning that they don’t have consistent or reliable access to sufficiently affordable and nutritious food. This is a problem we need to solve. Eradicating food waste is widely misunderstood as an out of reach ideal,...Continue Reading...
Fresh Food Waste Drops Profits & Raises Greenhouse Gases

Fresh Food Waste Drops Profits & Raises Greenhouse Gases

Did you know that fresh food waste contributes eight percent of global greenhouse gas emissions? When we think of fresh food waste and sustainability, oftentimes commentary about the issue focuses on food that is not being used to feed the hungry or wasted food taking up space in landfills. But what happens to waste once it’s in the landfill? Fresh food waste produces greenhouse gases…a lot of greenhouse gases. The Impact of Fresh Food Waste A recent article in the Wall Street Journal, The Climate Impact of the Food in the Back of...Continue Reading...
Food Sustainability: A Noble Goal but Is It Viable?

Food Sustainability: A Noble Goal but Is It Viable?

Food sustainability is something we all need to think about. My family was among the first to recycle cans (back before you got paid for doing that) and we did a lot of paper drives when I was in Cub Scouts. Having grown up as an environmentalist, and even taking environmental studies courses in college, it’s great to see the topic of sustainability discussed in both corporate America and the general public. The Three E’s of Sustainability When discussing the viability of food sustainability, there’s often talk of the three Es:...Continue Reading...
Sustainability or Greenwashing

Sustainability or Greenwashing

One of the greatest challenges humanity faces is figuring out how we’re going to feed another two billion people by 2050 when we can’t even feed all the people alive today. To solve this problem, it’s commonly cited that food production will need to increase by 50 percent globally.  Certainly, we can’t find enough land and other resources to cultivate that much food. And, yes, while new approaches like vertical farming can have a major impact, we also need to know how to make more efficient use of the food we produce today and...Continue Reading...